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Washington Police Investigating Ad Placed by Man Convicted of Child Porn

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Special Agent Don Condon from the Florida Department of Law Enforcement receives an instant message on his AOL account August 14, 2001 at the Broward County, Florida, office. (Credit: Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Special Agent Don Condon from the Florida Department of Law Enforcement receives an instant message on his AOL account August 14, 2001 at the Broward County, Florida, office. (Credit: Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

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OAKVILLE, Wash. (CBS Seattle) –  A convicted child porn offender is under the microscope once again.

An investigation is being conducted against an Oakville area man with a criminal past who recently placed an ad in his local newspaper looking to be a big brother for someone’s daughter, according to KOMO News in Seattle.

Ron Antonson placed an ad in the Centralia (Wash.) Chronicle, outlining his hobbies and pastimes. The ad read: “I’m 61 years old, I’m retired and would like to be a big brother to your 7 or 8 year old daughter. I like fishing, going to dinner, movies, bowling, etc. Call Ron.”

The ad, which was removed Monday, presents an uneasy problem for the community. According to media reports and public records, Antonson was involved in a 1995 incident, which led to a conviction of possession of child pornography, indecent exposure, and public indecency. Currently, the Grays Harbor Police Department are in the process of trying to figure out whether this was a blatant, immoral attempt to reach out to a minor or if he had genuine intentions, Det. Sgt. Steve Fhumae told CBS Seattle.

“Mr. Antonson is a very rare case,” Fhumae said. “I can’t remember in my 23 years of doing this that anyone has posted an ad seeking to be a big brother to a child.”

He added: “When you have a 61-year-old man seeking involvement with a 7- or 8-year-old girl, it raises awareness, which it obviously did for a number of individuals who had viewed that ad. Naturally, we’re going to be on the side of caution.”

Antonson expressed regret for his past discretions, but doesn’t feel as if he should be outlawed from being a big brother figure to a young girl, he told KOMO.

“I made a few mistakes in my life. Everybody does,” Antonson said. “The mistakes I made, I paid for them. But I’m not a baby raper and I’m not a child molester.”

In regard to what Antonson hopes to do in being a big-brother figure for a young girl, he represents a common disconnect that many people with a criminal background associated with child porn often face, said Dan Knoepfler, a licensed mental health counselor and certified sex offender treatment provider in the Seattle area. While the disconnect isn’t uncommon, the blatant matter in which Antonson went about posting the ad is a bit out of the ordinary, Knoepfler added.

“A lot of times, these guys have to adjust to the fact that their ability to interact with kids is severely limited and their ability to do certain things where kids tend to be is severely limited, too,” he said. “For some of these guys, it’s a bitter pill to swallow, especially for child-porn offenders.”

Whether Antonson’s intentions were immoral remains unclear, but he didn’t do himself, or his past, any favors.

“Certainly given his criminal history, he’s opened himself up to a lot of criticism by taking the actions he did,” Knoepfler said.

A voicemail left for Centralia Chronicle publisher Christine Fossett was not immediately returned.

The police expect to send this for review to the prosecutor’s office sometime next week to decide whether the ad is considered a crime.

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