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Seattle ‘Superhero’ Fired, Prohibited From Working With Children After Arrest

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Phoenix Jones, middle, is pictured here with actor Rainn Wilson, left, and director James Gunn in March of this year. (credit: Kevin Winter/Getty Images)

Phoenix Jones, middle, is pictured here with actor Rainn Wilson, left, and director James Gunn in March of this year. (credit: Kevin Winter/Getty Images)

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SEATTLE (CBS Seattle) – Seattle’s “superhero” is now looking for a job.

Phoenix Jones, who was arrested after pepper-spraying a group of men and women who he thought were fighting, has been released from his job assisting five developmentally disabled autistic children.

PubliCola.com reports that Washington State’s Department of Social and Health Services informed Jones, whose real name is Ben Fodor, in a letter last week that he is prohibited from working with the autistic children he had been with previously, as well as working with children in general.

“I realize when you make a stand against crime sometimes it fights back,” he wrote on his Facebook wall. “I have always assumed my body could be injured or I could be seriously hurt. I never assumed I would lose a job that I have had for 5 years, for not being charged with assault.”

A spokesman for the Department of Social and Health Services says the ‘superhero’ was working as a contract employee and is welcome to work with kids again once the matter is cleared up.

“The decision was made not to renew the contract,” spokesman Thomas Shapley told CBS Seattle. “If the matter is cleared up, he’s work than welcome to re-apply for the contract. He was not an employee.”

Jones’ 15 minutes of fame stemmed from a video of what the 23-year-old still claims to be of his masked persona breaking up a fight. Seattle police had a different point of view, arresting him for assault. Charges still haven’t been pressed and the case is still ongoing.

In his job, Jones worked with five children between the ages of 4 and 18 at their homes and taught them how to shop, balance checkbooks, and socialize in public, among other life skills.

But his recent trip to the unemployment line won’t keep him from his other job, vowing to do day patrols when he isn’t looking for work.

“The real losers [here] are the kids that won’t understand why I’m not able to see them anymore,” he wrote.

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