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Montana Town Where ‘Custer’s Last Stand’ Took Place Up For Auction

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An image of Garryowen Montana (Photo Credit: Williams & Williams)

An image of Garryowen Montana (Photo Credit: Williams & Williams)

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GARRYOWEN, Mont. (CBS Seattle) — It was where the Battle of Little Bighorn started and where Chief Sitting Bull camped out, and now this historic town could be yours.

Garryowen, Mont., a town that’s located between two other major tourist attractions, Yellowstone National Park and Mount Rushmore, is on the auction block by Williams & Williams — the same firm that sold Buford, Wyo., the smallest town in America.

Garryowen could be bid for online through the site auctionnetwork.com. The 7.7 acre lot contains two buildings. One is the “Town Hall” that the site describes as a “15,400+/- sf three-level building containing an income-producing convenience store, sandwich shop, retail space, U.S. Post Office and (a) penthouse residence.”

The other is a small office building with guest residences. However, the winner also gets water and mineral rights, and the picnic grounds. The properties also contain the Custer Battlefield Museum, a museum dedicated to Gen. George A. Custer, who famously lost his life in the Battle of Little Bighorn, better known as “Custer’s last stand.” The museum, though, is not for sale.

Custer even had a hand in naming the town. Garry Owen, originally an Irish drinking song, was the fighting song for his 7th Calvary around the time of the Battle of Little Bighorn.

But if owning a town is too much commitment, the personal documents of Elizabeth Bacon Custer, the general’s wife, are also on the chopping block. Williams & Williams states that her papers are an archive of “thousands” of letters, documents, and manuscripts that range from the Civil War, all the way to World War I.

To how much the town could go for is anyone’s guess. Amy Bates from Williams & Williams told CBS Seattle that it’s the value will be determined by the bidders and that is the “beauty of auctions.”

“How do you determine the value of a town? Especially one like Garryowen that has so much historical significance,” Bates told CBS Seattle.

Initial bidding for Garryowen starts at $250,000. The auction takes place next month.

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