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Seahawks

Swartz: Seahawks Receiver Options

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(Photo by Stephen Brashear/Getty Images)

(Photo by Stephen Brashear/Getty Images)

BILL  BIO PHOTO Bill Swartz
One of the Pacific Northwest’s most versatile talents, Bill Swartz...
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Draft a speed-burning youngster.  Trade for an explosive play-maker.  Sign a proven veteran free-agent?  How about a combination of those for the Seattle Seahawks as they look to improve the passing game in 2013 and beyond.

First you have to ask  important questions if you’re the Seahawks front office.  Seattle is a run-oriented offense, so how much should we invest in more receivers?   Do we want to become a New England, or Green Bay style offense with Russell Wilson chuking the football 35 to 40 times a game?

The Hawks have already shelled out big dollars for a number one receiver, paying Sidney Rice $8.2 million per year.  Rice had a decent 2012 season, with 50 receptions.   Just 13 of those catches were longer than 20 yards.

With 45 grabs and 7 touchdowns, Golden Tate finally started showing Seattle fans why he was a second round draft pick in 2010.  Russell Wilson developed a trust knowing Tate can go up and get the football in one-on-one situations.

Doug Baldwin is a competent slot receiver working for a relatively low wage. Tight ends Zach Miller and Anthony McCoy showed off their receiving abilities in the late stages of the season when the Seahawks offense was putting up better than 30 points per game.

Adding a guy to stretch the field can only enhance Seattle’s other strengths.  Safeties would not be able to focus as much on the deep middle, or cheat up in the box to contain Marshawn Lynch.

It’s no secret Pete Carroll likes the taller, bigger outside receivers in the mold of Mike Williams, Terrell Owens, and Braylon Edwards.  Look closely at this week’s NFL Draft combine and you’ll see plenty of youngsters with height and speed to tempt the Seahawks.

Marshall University’s Aaron Dobson, 6′-4″, 203 pounds, and Terrance Williams 6′-2″, 201 pounds from Baylor University could both still be around when Seattle picks in the second round of the draft.   USC’s Robert Woods and Oregon State’s Markus Wheaton have faster times in the 40 yard dash than Dobson or Williams.

Deep threat receiver is not an urgent need for the Seahawks, but more of a luxury.  That’s why I don’t see Carroll and John Schneider going crazy in free agency and pursuing the Steelers Mike Wallace.

The Vikings don’t appear willing to trade a disgruntled Percy Harvin.  Even if they did, I’m not sure Harvin’s salary demands, and skill-set would compliment an already pretty good Seattle offense.

-Bill Swartz, 1090 The Fan

(TM and © Copyright 2013 CBS Radio Inc. and its relevant subsidiaries. CBS RADIO and EYE Logo TM and Copyright 2012 CBS Broadcasting Inc. Used under license. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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