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Study: Costco Sells Cheapest Drugs While CVS Most Expensive

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File photo of a Costco sign.  (credit: Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)

File photo of a Costco sign. (credit: Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)

CBS Seattle (con't)

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ISSAQUOH, Wash. (CBS Seattle) – A new study sheds light on where people should buy their prescription drugs.

According to a recent analysis by Consumer Reports, Costco is the least expensive pharmacy to buy prescription drugs.

Consumer Reports compared the prices at all major drug retailers including CVS Caremark, Rite Aid, and Target. CVS Caremark had the highest prices, the study states.

Researchers compared five of the most popular prescription drugs that have recently become available in generic form. The drugs are Actos for diabetes, Lexapro for depression, Singulair for asthma, Plavix for blood clots, and Lipitor for high cholesterol.

For example, the researchers found that a month’s worth of generic Lipitor cost $17 at Costco, while the same drug will cost $150 at CVS.

The report urges consumers to compare prices and look for quality service that an independent pharmacy may do to keep your business.

“If they want to retain your business and loyalty, they will help you get the best price,” Lisa Gill, an editor with Consumer Reports, told Reuters.

Consumer Reports used “secret shoppers” to call over 200 pharmacies across the country to find out how much a prescription drug will cost without insurance.

The report also recommends getting refills every 90 days instead of 30 as most pharmacies may offer discounts on a 3-month supply.

The report will be available in the May issue of Consumer Reports.

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