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Man Sorts Through Dog Poop To Retrieve $500

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File photo of a $100 bill ripped in pieces.  (credit: David Job/Getty Images)

File photo of a $100 bill ripped in pieces. (credit: David Job/Getty Images)

HELENA, Mont. (CBS Seattle) – What would you do to get $500 back? One man had to sort through dog poop to retrieve his money.

Around Christmas, Wayne Klinkel, his wife and their dog, went to see their daughter and her husband in Denver. According to the Helena Independent Record, the couple stopped for dinner and left the golden retriever, Sundance, in the car. They told the paper they also left five $100 bills locked in the vehicle.

When they returned to the car after dinner, the doors were still locked, but half of one of the $100 bills was lying on the driver’s seat while the rest were gone.

“Sundance is notorious for eating anything and everything, so right away I knew what happened,” Klinkel told the Independent Record.

Klinkel knew that paper did not digest so he followed Sundance around wearing rubber gloves and continued to pick up pieces of the money out of the poop.

“I pretty much revered two fairly complete bills, and had some other pieces, but it wasn’t nearly enough there to do anything with it,” Klinkel told the Independent Record.

Recently, his daughter came to Montana to visit him. With her, she brought more pieces of the money gathered in a small baggy. Klinkel told the paper that his son-in-law found the money in the backyard after the snow melted.

Klinkel does not want to be out $500 so he is trying to put the pieces of money together and get reimbursed for it. The Federal Reserve Bank in Helena told him to go to a local bank in hopes to be reimbursed.

Klinkel tried a larger local bank and was then told to inquire with the Department of the Treasury’s Bureau of Engraving and Printing.

According to the Department of Treasury, you only need 51 percent of a bill to be reimbursed for mutilated money. According to the Treasury’s website, “each case is carefully examined by an experienced mutilated currency examiner.”

If it is determined by the Bureau that the money is mutilated, the Treasury will send a check for the amount. That can take up to two years.

“Guess we’ll just have to wait and see what happened,” Klinkel added.

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