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Woman To Give Letters To ‘Moderately Obese’ Trick-Or-Treaters Instead Of Candy

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Children trick-or-treat on Halloween. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

Children trick-or-treat on Halloween. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

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FARGO, N.D. (CBS Seattle) – A local woman has stirred up controversy after vowing to hand overweight children letters of warning about their health instead of candy this Halloween.

According to Valley News Live, the woman – identified only as Cheryl – recently called into the area’s Y-94 radio station to voice her concern regarding the health of children in her neighborhood.

“I just want to send a message to the parents of kids that are really overweight,” she was quoted as saying. “I think it’s just really irresponsible of parents to send them out looking for free candy  just [be]cause all the other kids are doing it.”

The station subsequently obtained a copy of the letter.

“You are probably wondering why your child has this note; have you ever heard of the saying, ‘It takes a village to raise a child?’” the letter begins.

It later states, “Your child is, in my opinion, moderately obese … and should not be consuming sugar and treats to the extent of some children this Halloween.”

CBS Seattle’s 2013 Halloween Guide

The letter has since been shared through various social networking sites, leading to words of both support and derision alike for the woman’s plan from parents and others throughout the nation.

Dr. Katie Gordon, an assistant professor of clinical psychology at North Dakota State University, noted one negative attribute when speaking with Valley News Live.

“It’s just that kind of thing that for some kids, if they’re vulnerable, might trigger major problems,” she was quoted as saying. “That’s not something that someone can judge … the health of someone … just by looking at them. I think that’s the main thing. Even if a child is overweight, they might be very healthy because of what they eat and how they exercise.”

Gordon then added, “It’s ineffective anyway because it’s not likely to help the kid.”

(TM and © Copyright 2013 CBS Radio Inc. and its relevant subsidiaries. CBS RADIO and EYE Logo TM and Copyright 2013 CBS Broadcasting Inc. Used under license. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.)

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