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Prosecutor: Italian Appeals Court Should Reinstate Knox Guilty Verdict

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Amanda Knox waves to supporters as she makes her first appearance at SeaTac Airport after arriving in Seattle following her release from prison in Italy on Oct. 4, 2011. (credit: Kevin Casey/AFP/Getty Images)

Amanda Knox waves to supporters as she makes her first appearance at SeaTac Airport after arriving in Seattle following her release from prison in Italy on Oct. 4, 2011. (credit: Kevin Casey/AFP/Getty Images)

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FLORENCE, Italy (AP) — The prosecutor seeking to reinstate Amanda’s Knox’s guilty verdict in her roommate’s 2007 murder urged an appeals court on Monday not to repeat mistakes purportedly made by the court that freed her.

Prosecutor Alessandro Crini said Italy’s highest court had “razed to the ground” the Perugia appellate court’s 2011 decision to throw out the guilty verdicts by casting doubt on the logic that freed Knox and co-defendant Raffaele Sollecito. The high court ordered a fresh appeals trial, this time in Florence, saying the earlier appeals decision was full of contradictions.

Crini said the earlier appellate court had “pulverized the elements,” separating pieces of evidence that needed to be seen together to get a full picture of the crime.

Crini also argued that a break-in at the apartment had been staged to divert attention from Knox and Sollecito.

Both Knox and Sollecito denied any involvement, saying they weren’t in the apartment at the time. A third defendant, Ivory Coast-born Rudy Guede, was convicted in a separate trial of sexually assaulting and stabbing Kercher. His 16-year sentence, reduced in appeal from an initial 30 year sentence, was upheld by Italy’s highest court in 2010.

Knox and Sollecito were convicted in 2009 of killing Kercher, Knox’s 21-year-old British roommate, who was found with her throat slit in a pool of blood in her bedroom. They were sentenced to 26 years and 25 years in jail, respectively. The two were freed on appeal in 2011. Knox, who spent four years in jail, did not return to Italy for the third trial.

Sollecito was in court for a second time Monday, listening intently as Crini claimed that his alibi that he was working at his computer at the time of the murder was false, citing an expert opinion.

Sollecito, speaking outside the court during a break, called the prosecutor’s case “uncertain.”

“After all of this time,” Sollecito said, “I just continue to confront a situation of repeated accusations that have no foundation in reality or likelihood.”

(© Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

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