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Man Who Punched Girlfriend Ordered To Write ‘Boys Do Not Hit Girls’ 5,000 Times

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File photo of a judge's gavel. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

File photo of a judge’s gavel. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

YELLOWSTONE COUNTY, Mont. (CBS Seattle/AP) - A district judge has ordered a man who injured his girlfriend to write the phrase “boys do not hit girls” 5,000 times, in addition to a maximum prison sentence.

According to the Billings Gazette, the written list – which must be numbered – is due on May 23 of next year.

In addition, the man, 27-year-old Pacer Anthony Ferguson, could face eight years in Montana State Prison for violating conditions of a previous release, as well as six months in a Yellowstone County jail for hitting his girlfriend hard enough to fracture her skull in three separate places.

During her testimony, the victim said that she continues to suffer from the after-effects of Ferguson’s attack, which include symptoms such as double vision and numbness.

The judge who handed down the unique sentence was District Judge G. Todd Baugh – and this is not the first time he has made headlines.

Advocates for women urged the Montana Supreme Court on Friday to strike down a one-month prison sentence for a former high school teacher convicted of raping a freshman student. In a friend of the court brief, six advocacy groups told justices they should send the case to a new judge for re-sentencing.

Back in August, Baugh said that the 14-year-old victim appeared “older than her chronological age.” He sentenced former Billings teacher Stacey Rambold to 15 years in prison with all but one month suspended on a conviction for sexual assault.

The judge later apologized for his remarks after being widely criticized for them, and made an unsuccessful attempt to re-sentence Rambold after prosecutors said the short prison term violated state law.

(TM and © Copyright 2013 CBS Radio Inc. and its relevant subsidiaries. CBS RADIO and EYE Logo TM and Copyright 2013 CBS Broadcasting Inc. Used under license. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. The Associated Press contributed to this report.)

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