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new horizons

People look at an early image of Pluto taken by the New Horizons probe as the craft makes its closest fly-by of the dwarf planet at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory July 14, 2015 in Laurel, Maryland. The unmanned NASA spacecraft whizzed by Pluto on July 14, making its closest approach in the climax of a decade-long journey to explore the dwarf planet for the first time, the US space agency said. Moving faster than any spacecraft ever built -- at a speed of about 30,800 miles per hour (49,570 kph) -- the flyby happened at 7:49 am (1149 GMT), with the probe running on auto-pilot. It was to pass by Pluto at a distance of 7,767 miles (12,500 kilometers). AFP PHOTO/BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/Getty Images

Spotlight Shining On Pluto

Well, not quite, but the tiny, icy world is getting front-page, prime-time attention for its first visit by a spacecraft — NASA’s New Horizons.

CBS Seattle–07/14/2015

credit: NASA/Newsmakers/Getty Images

Best Views of Space are from Bellevue College’s Planetarium

The Geer Planetarium at Bellevue College is the only community college planetarium in Washington state. It has a state-of-the art Digistar 3 projector, accurately reproducing the night sky at any time of year within 900 light years of the sun. And they are offering a special spring show called New Horizons, and a chance for you to view the sky in 3-D!

02/03/2012