Arts & Culture

Best Permanent Exhibits In Seattle

July 15, 2013 5:00 AM

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credit: www.facebook.com/pages/Chihuly-Garden-and-Glass
Traveling museum exhibits come and go, and can inject a certain ‘wow’ factor into a region. However, a city’s permanent collection depicts more than just immediate awe; it shows the true artistic heart of the city, and Seattle is no exception to this sentiment. Seattle’s permanent exhibits show the city to be deeply entrenched and supportive of the arts. Exhibits ranging from the popular northwest art of blown glass to the more personal story of the Seattle parks and recreation movement are just small examples of a big city’s love for the arts. Check out these permanent exhibits currently on display in the Emerald City.

Chihuly Garden and Glass
305 Harrison St.
Seattle, WA 98109
(206) 753-4940
www.chihulygardenandglass.com

The Northwest is known for its blown glass artists, and who among them is more well-known than Dale Chihuly? Last May, the Seattle Center unveiled one of its largest endeavors to date, the Chihuly Garden and Glass installation, which boasts 12,000 square feet of Chihuly glass art that spans the massive indoor/outdoor venue. So, if you are looking for something fresh and new, look no further than the Chihuly Garden and Glass exhibit at the Seattle Center in downtown Seattle.

Related: Best Places for Glass Art in Seattle

Dinosaurs: A Journey Through Time
Pacific Science Center
200 2nd Ave. N.
Seattle, WA 98109
(206) 443-2001
www.pacificsciencecenter.org

“Dinosaurs: A Journey Through Time” is a fun, educational exhibit that transports visitors back in time to the Mesozoic Period. Onlookers can meet seven robotic dinosaurs in what would have been their natural habitat, while simultaneously learning about the technology and innovation in the world of animatronics. Besides the large robotic dinosaur portion of the exhibit, visitors can gander at the enormity of a duckbill dinosaur footprint, observe various dioramas and comb through a plethora of fossils from the era. “Dinosaurs: A Journey Through Time” is an exhibit for the whole family; it is an excellent chance for educators, parents and children to take a romp through the past to learn about our present and future.

Mirrors
Seattle Art Museum
1300 1st Ave.
Seattle, WA 98101
(206) 654-3210
www.seattleartmuseum.org

Doug Aitken’s artwork for the Seattle Art Museum is permanent in the fact that his newest piece, dubbed “Mirrors,” graces the entire First Avenue and Union corner entrance of the SAM. Billed as the “living kaleidoscope,” “Mirrors” runs revolving colored lights and local video footage upon the side of the museum. Even though Aitken’s is a globetrotting artist with work all across the world, the SAM’s exhibit will be Aitken’s first permanent exhibit. Check out Aitken’s spectacular display any day of the week by hitting up the corner of the SAM on First Avenue and Union.

The Olmsted Interpretive Exhibit
Volunteer Park
1247 15th Ave. E.
Seattle, WA 98112
(206) 684-4075
www.seattle.gov/parks

“The Olmsted Interpretive Exhibit” is a personal legacy for the Emerald City. This permanent exhibit is a bit different from the others listed because it tells the heartfelt origins of Seattle’s parks and recreation program. Without the Olmsted family, many of Seattle’s beloved parks and playgrounds may not exist, at least not in the capacity that they exist today. To truly see the Olmsted’s vision and to learn a little local history, check out the water tower in Volunteer park. The water tower offers a myriad of texts, maps and correspondences that can be used to piece together the Olmsted family vision as well as a spectacular view of the city.

Nano
Pacific Science Center
200 2nd Ave. N.
Seattle, WA 98109
(206) 443-2001
www.pacificsciencecenter.org

“Nano” is a permanent exhibit hosted by the Pacific Science Center and aims to share the intricate and powerful world of nanoscience. Mimicking atoms and molecular bonds in the fields of engineering and technology is launching our society into a new era of innovation, and “Nano” stands at the forefront of public nanoscience education. Stop on by the Pacific Science Center to study magnetic materials and bonds, build a replica nanotube and observe the effects of gravity and electrostatic electricity on varying sized bodies.

Related: Best Exhibits To Visit This Summer In Seattle

Anthony Schultz resides within the historic Brownes Addition of Spokane, WA. In his off time, Anthony enjoys copious amounts of reading, pages upon pages of scribbles, which he dubs his writings, and absorbing as much pop culture as humanly possible. His best days end with discussion with his longtime girlfriend, a book in hand, and an obese black and tan Dachshund (by the name of Norman) at his feet. His work can be found at Examiner.com.

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