2newcw11 thefan-am1090seattle-logo-fina2l
SUBWAY BEAST MODE CHALLENGE 2014 | Sign up for our 3.5-mile adventure run | INFO |

Arts & Culture

Best Places For Knitting In Seattle

January 21, 2013 5:00 AM

View Comments
(credit: Thinkstock)

(credit: Thinkstock)

(credit: Thinkstock)

(credit: Thinkstock)

Seattle has always been home to a thriving art culture as well as a vibrant social scene. Combining these two elements creates a wonderful synergy, especially for the area’s knitters. Knitting has always been a popular art, but within the past decade or so it has seen a rebirth. If you’re already a knitting lover, but need a few places that’ll welcome your people-watching, needle-working ways, these are the best places to knit in Seattle.

Kerry Park
211 W. Highland Drive
Seattle, WA 98119
(206) 684-4075
www.seattle.gov/parks/

Kerry Park is impressive in its own right, but what makes it especially remarkable is its view. Not only does Kerry Park provide an excellent oversight of downtown Seattle, but also of Elliot Bay. Most agree it is a must-go for any local or traveler. The hustle and bustle of Kerry Park create a wonderful social atmosphere that bristles with creative energy. So sit back and enjoy the sights and the soft grass, and resume that knitting project that has been sitting on the back burner for a bit. Kerry Park is a perfect getaway for knitters because it provides inspiration as well as a lively atmosphere.

Related: Seattle’s Best Parks And Gardens

Rendezvous
2322 2nd Ave.
Seattle, WA 98121
(206) 441-5823
www.jewelboxtheater.com

Rendezvous is unique in that it resides in one of the very first of Paramount’s talkies and now has grown to represent a slice of Seattle history as well as a piece of the Seattle’s social scene. During the day, it is easy to get carried away knitting in a booth beside the window. The natural lighting during a crisp day is perfect to lose yourself in your craft. In the evenings a show and drinks add to the ambience, and the oversized booths beckon to be cuddled up and lost away in during the methodical striking of needle tips.

Stumbling Monk
1635 E. Olive Way
Seattle, WA 98102
(206) 860-0916
www.stumblingmonk.com

The Stumbling Monk establishes a contemporary feel by transporting its patrons to a whimsical European city. The lighting is soft, and the staff is always friendly. With plenty of beer on tap, the bartenders are always happy to recommend suds for anyone’s taste buds. This is a great setting for knitting, perfectly quiet and low key. Find a good seasonal ale and a seat to start that next project; it will not disappoint.

TASTE Restaurant
1300 1st Ave.
Seattle, WA 98101
(206) 332-1348
www.tastesam.com

TASTE Restaurant is an establishment for artists. More often than not, patrons will be quietly sketching or knitting away after enjoying a scrumptious meal. TASTE blends the old with the new in terms of its decor, and its lighting is fairly modern to make it easier to see than your typical poorly lit restaurant. Kick back and knit among natural wood furnishings. TASTE is an experience, so take a chair, order up a meal and a drink, and let the creative juices flow.

Urbane
1639 8th Ave.
Seattle, WA 98101
(206) 676-4600
www.urbaneseattle.com

Urbane is a one-of-a-kind restaurant and lounge that offers farm-to-table cuisine, which presents a truly one-of-a-kind experience. Not only does Urbane feature a wide, open feeling with superb lighting set in a modern motif, but it also houses some of the best mixologists in Seattle. Urbane practically calls for knitters to grab a cocktail, find a comfy couch, and starting clicking away on those needles. Gather a group and head on down. The lighting is perfect for alleviating eye fatigue, and the lounge provides an excellent atmosphere to knit and drink by.

Related: Best Independent Fabric Stores In Seattle

Anthony Schultz resides within the historic Brownes Addition of Spokane, WA. In his off time, Anthony enjoys copious amounts of reading, pages upon pages of scribbles, which he dubs his writings, and absorbing as much pop culture as humanly possible. His best days end with discussion with his longtime girlfriend, a book in hand, and an obese black and tan Dachshund (by the name of Norman) at his feet. His work can be found at Examiner.com.

View Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus