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Arts & Culture

Most Community-Centered Bookstores in Seattle

May 20, 2013 5:00 AM

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Photo Credit: Thinkstock

Photo Credit: Thinkstock

Photo Credit: Thinkstock

Photo Credit: Thinkstock

Large metropolitan cities definitely have a distinct advantage over their smaller counterparts when it comes to great bookshop finds. More books are always good thing, but dig deeper and soon, out of the plethora of bookstores, some will start to rise to the top. These bookstores are the creme de la creme when it comes to keeping that Seattle flavor and community centered bookshop alive and well.

East West Bookshop
6500 Roosevelt Way N.E.
Seattle, WA 98115
(206) 523-3726
www.eastwestbookshop.com

Open since 1989, East West Bookshop is a store for the mind, body, and soul. The shop specializes in a myriad of exercises and training of thought to help benefit all aspects of a person. Besides being locally owned and an Indie Bound member, East West Bookshop also holds numerous weekly events including (but not limited to): Yoga, clairvoyances, meditation, astrology, and tarot card readings.

Third Place Books
Ravenna
6504 20th Ave. N.E.
Seattle, WA 98115
(206) 525-2347
www.thirdplacebooks.com

Ravenna Third Place Books is must-see for book lovers. It manages to bottle up that Seattle fell by following a fairly simple life code, “Sociologist Ray Oldenberg suggests that each of us needs three places: first is the home; second is the workplace or school; and beyond lies the place where people from all walks of life interact, experiencing and celebrating their commonality as well as their diversity. It is a third place.” Ravenna’s is that third place. This shop has a little something for everyone and welcomes customers to peruse the book stacks or come on by for the author reading and signings.

Related: Seattle’s Best Independent Bookstores

Seattle Mystery
117 Cherry St.
Seattle, WA 98104
(206) 587-5737
www.seattlemystery.com

Seattle Mystery has grown to not only encompass the local scene, but also a much larger, regional one as well. It draws people from the outside into the confines of the community, emboldening it and making it stronger. Specializing in the mystery genre, Seattle Mystery is incredibly supportive of small, local authors to the big timers on tour. The only stipulation is that it has to be a mystery. Hankering a ‘whodunit’? Stop on by Seattle Mystery for the fix.

Arundel Books
214 1st Ave. S., Suite B-18
Seattle, WA 98104
(206) 624-4442
www.arundelbookstores.com

Arundel Books resides in the heart of the history of Seattle, Pioneer Square. Sitting directly beneath the Grand Central Bakery, people can grab a bite and then head on down to flip through the pages of Arundel’s selection. Originally established in 1984 to sell first print editions of literature and the graphic arts, Arundel has grown to carry a little bit of everything and boasts an online selection of more than 100,000 titles! If you’re in the neighborhood, stop by and give ‘em a gander or if you’re looking for something specific, check out the online store for more.

Globe Books
Pioneer Square
218 1st Ave. S.
Seattle, WA 98104
(206) 682-6882
http://www.pioneersquare.org

Globe Books also sits within Seattle’s historic Pioneer Square along with Arundel Books and the Grand Central Bakery. Heralded as one of the true independent bookstores of Seattle, Globe Books packs a wallop. One of the trademarks of Globe Books is the owner, John Siscoe. He is noted as being friendly and knowledgeable of books in almost every genre. If anything, stop by Globe Books to have a great literary conversation.

Related: 5 Must-Read Books By Seattle Authors

Anthony Schultz resides within the historic Brownes Addition of Spokane, WA. In his off time, Anthony enjoys copious amounts of reading, pages upon pages of scribbles, which he dubs his writings, and absorbing as much pop culture as humanly possible. His best days end with discussion with his longtime girlfriend, a book in hand, and an obese black and tan Dachshund (by the name of Norman) at his feet. His work can be found at Examiner.com.

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