Seattle is the city of grunge and coffee, tech companies and animal lovers. According to a recent poll for the best cities for dogs, Estately ranked the Emerald City third in the nation. The city’s love of canine companions is reflected in its plentiful pet stores, pet-friendly establishments, pet-related events and variety of dog parks. From Magnuson to Marymoor and from Golden Gardens to Luther Burbank, these are the best parks in Seattle for your canine companion. Whether you’re looking for sandy beaches, wooded trails, fields or off-leash playtime for your pup, there’s a dog park to please every pup and their person! 

Warren G. Magnuson Park 
7400 Sand Point Way N.E.
Seattle, WA 98127
(206) 684-4946
www.seattle.gov

If you’re looking for off-leash room to roam and numerous walking trails, Warren G. Magnuson Park is the place to be. And if your pup loves to swim, you’re in luck; Magnuson Park has the only off-leash area with water access within Seattle’s city limits. The park’s permanent off-leash area was created in 1999 and contains nine acres with several access points, including a separate gated-off area south of the main entrance for smaller and more timid dogs. The park has winding trails and a flat play area and most of the trails are also wheelchair accessible.

Golden Gardens Park 
8498 Seaview Pl. N.W.
Seattle, WA 98117
(206) 684-4075
www.seattle.gov

Golden Gardens Park, located on Puget Sound, features forested trails, a coastline with tidelands, an expansive sandy beach and a breathtaking view of the Olympics. The park comprises almost 88 acres, including a one-acre off-leash area for dogs, located in the northern region of the park. The off-leash area has trees throughout, as well as a play area covered in wood chips. The park also has a small covered area, tables and benches that are perfect for post-play picnics in all weather conditions. 


Westcrest Park Off Leash Area 
Highland Park 
8806 8th Ave. S.W.
Seattle, WA 98138
www.seattle.gov

The Westcrest Park off-leash area, which is located on a hill above Boeing Field, is a permanent off-leash site that was created in 1999. The park comprises four fenced acres, with paths, trees, grassy slopes, a doggie drinking fountain and open spaces for play. Is your dog shy or small? The park also features a separate area, located on the southwest side of the off-leash area, that’s just for small and shy dogs. 


Luther Burbank Park 
2040 84th Ave. S.E.
Mercer Island, WA 98040
(206) 275-7609
www.mercergov.org

Located east and adjacent to Seattle in Mercer Island, Luther Burbank Park offers a central location between the east side and the city. The park is located on the northeast end of Mercer Island, featuring a fenced off-leash dog area at its northernmost tip. Luther Burbank is a longtime Seattle-area favorite because of its easy access off I90, million-dollar views of Lake Washington and its separate area for shy dogs. The park comprises 77 acres, including almost a mile of Lake Washington waterfront. When you’re done playing, use the dedicated doggie wash area to wash the water, sand and mud off of your dogs. 


Marymoor Dog Park
6046 W. Lake Sammamish Parkway N.E.
Redmond, WA 98052
(206) 205-3661
www.kingcounty.gov

Referred to as “Doggie Disneyland” by some visitors, Marymoor Park encompasses 640 acres, includes sprawling fields and an expansive 40-acre off-leash dog area. Marymoor is King County’s oldest and largest park and is located across the water from Seattle in Redmond at the north end of Lake Sammamish. The off-leash dog park area is a haven for humans and canines alike; it’s well maintained and includes a series of paths, forested areas and a river for dogs to get their paws wet. There are five river access points, with soft, sandy beaches and opportunities for dogs of all ages and sizes to play together. Picking up after your pets is also easy because the park provides plastic “pick up” bags and has trash receptacles conveniently placed throughout the area.

Tracy Campion is a freelance writer covering all things Seattle. Her work can be found on Examiner.com.

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