What do you give the dad who has everything? Let’s face it: if you ask your dad what he wants for Father’s Day, he’ll probably just give you some sarcastic answer. But a guy has got to eat, right? To make Father’s Day special, take him to someplace he’s never been before that will be sure to treat him as the special man that he is. Here are five great restaurants, all with different price ranges and food choices, worth checking out.
The Salish Lodge
6501 Railroad Ave. SE
Snoqualmie, WA 98065
800.272.5474
www.salishlodge.com

The Father’s Day brunch held at The Salish Lodge is one of the priciest options out there ($80 per adult), but if you can swing it, the meal will certainly be a memorable event, and the views of the majestic Snoqualmie Falls are just incredible. The four course meal comes with seasonal fruit and berries served with organic Devonshire cream, alongside a house-made baker’s basket of coffee cakes, scones and muffins. This starter course is followed by a choice of four small entrees (buttermilk pancakes, organic potato bisque, cinnamon roll skillet or stone fruit salad) and then a choice of six larger entrees (meat and eggs fare) and finally a choice of a variety of miniature cakes and pastries.

Metropolitan Grill
820 2nd Ave.
Seattle, WA 98104
206.624.3287
www.themetropolitangrill.com

The award-winning Metropolitan Grill is one of the city’s best steakhouses, but you won’t find any peanut shells on the floor here. After being greeted by the tuxedo-clad maître d’, you’ll walk passed a glass display of some of the finest cuts of beef that you’ll find anywhere. Here, you’ll find out why the restaurant has such a great reputation for serving up the best filet mignon, New York peppercorn steak, Delmonico, porterhouse and tableside-cared Chateabriand. Pair your meal with a selection from the wine spectator’s “Best of Award of Excellence” wine list.

B3 Breakfast And Burger Bar
4027 196th St. S.W.
Lynnwood, WA 98036
425.672.3666
www.b3wa.com

Located up north in Lynnwood, the unassuming B3 Breakfast and Burger Bar restaurant is a hidden gem in plain sight. The locals know that the prices of the meals are very fair, and the portions are huge. This restaurant isn’t a greasy spoon. It serves up unique twists of favorite dishes like seeded cinnamon raisin bread French toast, lemon ricotta blueberry pancakes and a smoked salmon omelet with goat cheese and hollandaise sauce. You’ll find all your favorite traditional breakfast choices here as well and the biggest biscuits you’ll find anywhere. B3 also features a delectable list of hamburgers and sandwiches (Pork-a-holic, Baja Shrimp), a variety of mac and cheese dishes, as well as shakes and floats.

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Altstadt
209 1st Ave. S.
Seattle, WA 98104
(206) 602-6442
www.altstadtseattle.com

“Nothing says, ‘I love you, Dad’ like a beer and a brat!” says Alstadt, located in Pioneer Square. Known for making the “unfamiliar, familiar,” Alstadt will be offering a special one liter draft beer, brezel and sausage plate special all day. The German restaurant offers a homey atmosphere for the less-stuffy type of father, serving up authentic German and Sudetenland cuisine with local and import brews.

Cutter’s Crabhouse
2001 Western Ave.
Seattle, WA 98121
(206) 448-4884
cutterscrabhouse.com

Located next to Pike Place Market, Cutter’s Crabhouse is celebrating Father’s Day with a free gift for everyone who dines there on June 18 or 19. Don’t be fooled by the name, as Cutter’s offers a large menu of options beside just crab, including sushi, salmon, burgers and steaks. Cutter’s is still looking good from its 2012 remodel too. Being close to the market helps ensure that the best Northwest ingredients will be found in all of the dishes that the restaurant serves.

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Jeffrey Totey is a freelance writer living in Seattle. He has a love for the arts and is a student of pop culture. He covers stories about the performing arts, theater, museums, cultural events, movies and more in the greater Seattle area. His work can be found at Examiner.com.
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