Seattle residents are lucky they live so close to a big city full of entertainment, but still have numerous nearby locations where they can enjoy the full extent of the Pacific Northwest’s beautiful landscape and outdoor fun. If you and your family are fishing enthusiasts, you’ll find a number of fantastic fishing spots just a short drive from downtown Seattle. Pack your fishing gear and a picnic lunch and get set to cast your lines and pots to catch some of the best seafood the Puget Sound waters has to offer.
Belvoir Place (Union Bay/Lake Union)
3659 42nd Ave. N.E.
Seattle, WA 98105
(206) 684-4075
seattle.gov

Belvoir Place on Seattle’s Union Bay is about ten minutes northeast of downtown and is open daily from 4 a.m. to 11:30 p.m. This smaller, grassy fishing spot in the Laurelhurst neighborhood overlooks Union Bay and Lake Union, has a small dock and is one of the least chaotic fishing locations in the Seattle area. It has a small boat launch for hand-carried boats and is a designated pesticide-free park. It’s a great spot for first-time fishermen and for teaching your kids how to fishl. The prime months to fish here are April to October and you’ll find fish species such as largemouth and smallmouth bass, and sometimes yellow perch, black crappie, and the coastal cutthroat.

Green Lake Park (Green Lake)
7201 E Greenlake Drive N.
Seattle, WA 98115
(206) 684-4075
seattle.gov

Green Lake is a popular lake and fishing spot about ten minutes directly north of downtown. It’s a more crowded location for fishing, and offers other water sports activities including swimming, windsurfing and small boating (hand-carried boats). It features a fishing pier, a guarded beach, is open 24 hours, and has year-round fishing opportunities for rainbow and brown trout, carp, catfish and rock bass. Green Lake Park also features a nicely constructed, almost 3-mile path for jogging, dog walking, skateboarding, rollerblading and cycling that surrounds the lake.

Fairview Park (Lake Union)
2900 Fairview Ave. E.
Seattle, WA 98102
(206) 684-4075
seattle.gov

Fairview Park is about five minutes north of downtown Seattle in the Portage Bay neighborhood. It’s a smaller, less-crowded park that has a small boat launch for hand-carried boats, and an upper level that features a bike rack, stone and log benches, picnic tables and a deck with an outlook viewpoint. Fairview Park is open daily 4 a.m. to 11:30 p.m. and offers fishing opportunities from March to October. If you’re lucky, you may catch steelhead trout and migratory salmon in this location, as they use Lake Union as a pathway to the larger Lake Washington. Other fish species found here include largemouth bass, sucker fish, brown bullhead, perch, bluegill and bream.

Related: Best Hiking Trails In Seattle

Elliott Bay
1301 Alaskan Way
Seattle, WA 98101
(206) 684-4075
seattle.gov

Elliott Bay, which runs along Seattle’s waterfront, has a couple of phenomenal fishing spots for people of all ages. Pier 86 in the Magnolia neighborhood is one of the city’s best-kept fishing secrets. It features a 400-foot fishing pier and is equipped with its own bait shop and covered fish-cleaning stations. The Elliott Bay waterfront park is another great fishing spot that sits on Seattle’s main thoroughfare of Alaskan Way. It spans from Pier 57 to Pier 59 and features safety guard rails, sitting benches, and, on clear days, views of the Olympic Mountains. Elliott Bay is filled with numerous fish and seafood species including squid, Dungeness crab, salmon, rockfish, lingcod, halibut, sturgeon and many more.

Lake Washington
5895 Lake Washington Blvd. S.
Seattle, WA 98118
(206) 684-4396
wdfw.wa.gov

Lake Washington is a 20-mile-long body of water that sits just east of downtown Seattle. Fishing along Lake Washington is open year-round and there are a number of prime spots to cast your line. One favorite fishing location is the Reverend Murphy Fishing Pier near Seward Park. It has one of the best unobstructed views of Mount Rainier in all of Seattle and a nice fishing pier, as well. You can also try locations such as Rainier Beach Park, the northern end of Mercer Island and Sand Point’s Magnuson Park. Lake Washington is home to more than 40 fish species, including bass, trout, salmon, coho, chinook and several others. Dress in layers for this fishing location as it can get windy at times.

Related: Best Places For Horseback Riding Near Seattle

Sue Gabel has been writing entertainment and travel-related articles in the greater Puget Sound/Seattle area since 1999. She writes about music, the Seattle scene and more. Her work can be found on Examiner.com.

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