Make plans now to attend one of these great family events where you’ll all enjoy getting out of the house and have some fun. These fairly inexpensive events have something for the whole family. Here are five of the best upcoming events.
Washington State Spring Fair
110 9th Ave. S.W.
Puyallup, WA 98371
(253) 841-5045
www.thefair.com

The Washington State Spring Fair has grown in popularity since it began a few years ago. It is a great event for families who enjoy the fair experience and can’t wait until the bigger fair in the fall. It is also a more compact fair with lighter crowds, which might be more appealing for families with younger children. This year’s fair will be held April 14-17 and features four new acres of fun. Enjoy amusement rides, lots of food booths, a petting zoo, and workshops on garden care. Enjoy free entertainment like the fantastic DockDogs show and the new TimberWorks Lumberjack show. You might also want to save a few bucks to attend one of the Motorsport Mayhem shows as well. And unlike the fall fair – parking is free.

International Children’s Festival
Seattle Center
305 Harrison St.
Seattle, Washington 98109
(206) 684-7200
www.childrensfest.tacawa.org

The International Children’s Festival will be held in the Fisher Pavilion in the Seattle Center on Saturday and Sunday, April 16 and 17 from 11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. each day. Since 2010, this free event takes time to honor children from all over the world and allowing children from the Northwest to have a greater understanding of other cultures. Your family will enjoy a variety of music and dance performances which might be like going through Disneyland’s “It’s a Small World” ride but with real children and no boats.

Spring Carnival And Homespun Bazaar
Evergreen State Fairgrounds
14405 179th Ave. S.E.
Monroe, WA 98272
(360) 805-6700
www.evergreenfair.org

Not to be outdone by the Washington State Fair, the Evergreen State Fairgrounds will be holding their own spring event on April 22-24. The carnival will be in operation all weekend, but most of the other events will be taking place on Saturday and Sunday only. Admission is free, but parking is $5. Many of the events are free and include arts and crafts booths, a root beer garden, food booths, kids’ activities, live music, the Busy Bee Quilt Show, The Daffodil Arabian Horse Show, the underrated Wester Heritage Museum (it really is worth taking the time for) and the Evergreen Speedway will be having events held all weekend long.

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NFFTY (National Film Festival For Talented Youth)
SIFF Cinema at the Uptown
511 Queen Anne Ave. N.
Seattle, WA 98109
(206) 905-8400
www.nffty.org

This special film festival features the accomplished works of film directors who are age 24 and under which is sort of American Idol for filmmakers and boasts of being the world’s largest film festival of its’ kind. Covering all kinds of topics and genres, NFFTY stresses that the event is not for youth only and “has the perfect film for a film fan of any age.” Many of the films will be presented at the SIFF (Seattle International Film Festival) Cinema at the Uptown Theater but some will also be presented at the Cinerama as well.

Camlann Medieval Festival
10320 Kelly Road N.E.
Carnation, WA 98014
(425) 788-8624
www.camlann.org

The Camlann Medieval Festival is celebrating its’ 18th year in Carnation on April 30 and May 1 from noon to 5:00 p.m. Events include local crafters demonstrations (weaving, wool, dyeing, blacksmithing, shoemaking, pottery, hearth cooking and candle-making), the May games and entertainment (longbow archery, village dancing, medieval music, magic shows) lots of food and of course, a May pole. Medieval clothing is encouraged and clothing rentals are available on site as well.

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Jeffrey Totey is a freelance writer living in Seattle. He has a love for the arts and is a student of pop culture. He covers stories about the performing arts, theater, museums, cultural events, movies and more in the greater Seattle area. His work can be found at Examiner.com.

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